Lupin III: A Woman Named Fujiko Mine Episode 11 Review

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Episode 11, "The Feast of Fools"

 

 

*****SPOILERS*****
 
Synopsis:  Oscar remembers when he was young and Zenigata saved him from drowning. In the present, Zenigata discusses with Oscar a rash of new thefts pulled off by Fujiko, and says he won't be allowed to pursue Lupin until he arrests her. Fujiko, meanwhile, is in the care of Goemon. When Goemon hears about the thefts from the radio, he decides to investigate. Zenigata sets up a trap at the Musee de Marsene to get Fujiko, but a valuable tiara is stolen, regardless. Both Zenigata and Lupin come to the conclusion that Fujiko isn't the one stealing the artifacts, that it's the work of a dirty cop. Zenigata leaves catching Fujiko to Oscar, who it turns out has been framing Fujiko. Exasperated that the inspector refuses to show interest in Fujiko's crimes, Oscar decides to frame her for an officer's murder. The owl group approach him and tell him he has their support. Oscar sends another fake warning from Fujiko, saying that she will steal the jeweled wedding dress of the "bride of the year" at the Fete Nationale. Meanwhile, Count Almeida continues observation of Fujiko. A bomb threat is called into the police. Zenigata appears and tells Oscar he doubts Fujiko is behind it. Oscar is angered by this and is then approached again by the owl group. They plan a bomb explosion as a distraction so that Oscar can take the dress. At the parade, Oscar waits for the plan to go into action. Goemon blocks the path of the parade with his sword. Lupin finds the bomb under the bridge and decides to disable it. The owl men surround Goemon. After hearing from Zenigata about protecting one's pride, Oscar runs off. Under the bridge, Lupin tries to disconnect the bomb, but Oscar interrupts and grabs it, jumping into the water below. The bomb explodes underwater. 
 
Comments:
 
Now, I have to admit, I haven't commented on the character of Oscar all that much (save for a bit in the last review), because I'm not that interested in him. I can understand where they were trying to go with this character, showing how obsessing over somebody could twist you and make you act irrational. But he seemed kind of annoying most of the time and I wondered where they were going with him, if anywhere. 
 
Until now, Oscar has been an unstable, but fairly innocent, if not overzealous. But in this episode, he's gone as far as murder and theft to satisfy his desire to see Fujiko brought to justice and therefore Inspector Zenigata pleased. He has gone completely overboard and has even conspired with the Glaucus owl people. It may even have been that the owls weren't planning on blowing up the bridge until there were people on it (a possibility I can't ignore given the nature of Almeida). I mean, framing Fujiko for thefts is one thing, stupid, but not nearly as bad as killing a fellow police officer to frame Fujiko. Clearly his hatred for Fujiko and desire for Zenigata pushed him over the edge. 
 
It was interesting then to see where they actually went with this, and I think it paid off, when Zenigata gives a speech about how saving Oscar when he was young taught him to always protect the "one thing", your personal pride. We not only get to see some of Zenigata's ideals, closely guarded in this show where he seems dogged, but distant, but Oscar realizes the horror of what he'd been doing, and makes the decision to stop the scheme with the owl men his way. He realizes that even if he's too corrupt, he has to protect Zenigata's honor. 
 
Another noteworthy aspect of the episode is Goemon's treatment of Fujiko. Goemon knows that Fujiko is not the innocent soul he thought she was when he first met her. She has a difficult personality, and is not as pure as he would like her to be. However, we see him taking care of her in her time of need, when she is at her lowest. We always knew Goemon was a noble, but I really admire him for helping her. And hey, Goemon almost met Lupin in this episode! Pity they missed each other, since they were both working towards the same goal. 
 
Lupin himself seemed pretty dedicated in trying to clear Fujiko's name, too, but it was more like a hobby to him than anything else. 
 
Anyway, a good episode. Not great, but good. I found myself feeling sorry for a character I didn't care that much for previously, so that says something about it. 
 
Overall Score:

 

4 out of 5