Rants & Raves

Rants & Raves

Audio: English: Tykes, Toys, Rude Little Boys: A Look At Shin Chan

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Audio: English
With the Audio:English series, PenguinTruth takes a critical look at the English
dubs which grace some of anime's most defining series in North America.

 

My last article was about my quality categories for anime English dubs. I set down general rules for what makes a dub "good", "tolerable", and terrible. Good dubs have accurate scripts and solid voice acting. Tolerable dubs are the ones that just sort of make it, but don't impress. And terrible dubs are, well, pretty explanatory. Either they have terribly inaccurate scripts, or bad voice performances, or more usually, both. There are a fair number of dubs I could classify in any of those three categories. But one English dub I never know quite where to put is Funimation's Shin Chan

Tiger & Bunny - Episode 4 Review - Fear is Often Greater than the Danger

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Tiger & Bunny is a new anime program current airing weekly in Japan and simulcast on Hulu and Viz Anime. Produced by Sunrise it's  directed by Keiichi Satou (best known for his work on Big O). The series revolves around a couple of super heroes who fight crime while driving ad revenue and product placement for a hero themed television program.

 

George Takei is a Dolt

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(By ssoosay via Flickr)

 

Earlier in the week George Takei sat down with The Advocate to discuss his petition against Warner Brothers casting primarily white actors in an upcoming American adaption of the Japanese manga and anime classic, Akira. His main point is that Hollywood should cast more Asian-American actors in movie roles. A fair point on its own. However his arguments are full of curious inconsistencies. Take a look...

Typical DBZ Fan on YouTube Presents: Japanese Voices Sound Like Pussies

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So, often when I read YouTube comments on Japanese clips of Dragon Ball/Z/GT/Kai material, I often run into this little gem:

Yeah, "no offense".  
I know, that's so right, isn't it? I mean, clearly the entire cast is filled with girly, weak-sounding pansies. Just listen to these clips!

Ryo Horikawa as Vegeta:

I mean, really! Listen to that feminine, high pitched whiny voice for Japanese Vegeta. Jeez, what a woman. It's a good thing Chris Sabat saved this character with his all-too-distinct and not generic at all growly mean voice! 

Toshio Furukawa as Piccolo:

Audio: English - Good, Tolerable, and Terrible and the Tiers Game

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Audio: English
With the Audio:English series, PenguinTruth takes a critical look at the English
dubs which grace some of anime's most defining series in North America.

If you've ever been to 4chan, you know that they love tier charts. This is where they seperate things in categories of quality. Usually the top tier is "GOD TIER" and the lowest is "SHIT TIER", and I've done this myself, even here (my Gundam Tiers articles, for instance, which you can expect a follow up to sometime this or next year). However, unlike Anonymous at at 4chan, I'm actually capable and willing to explain and/or defend my choices as to what is truly "god" and what is "shit" in terms of the trival stuff I like.

Anime Fan Guilt: The Case of the Rabid Anti-Weeaboo

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Something I've come across quite frequently in anime fandom nowadays is what I consider "anime fan guilt", wherein a fan of anime, so insecure over the fact that he is a fan of foreign cartoons, completely overcompensates by condemning Japanese things. It's an interesting phenomenon that at first I was unable to grasp, as I thought at first that it was legitimate criticism of the Japanese culture given by people who were otherwise fans of their animation, reasonable people who liked anime, but weren't into all things Japanese. However, I soon discovered that this wasn't the case. This "criticism" became more and more pronounced as I dove deeper into the anime fandom. It became, in short, a parody of itself.

Audio: English - My Philosophy

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Audio: English
With the Audio:English series, PenguinTruth takes a critical look at the English
dubs which grace some of anime's most defining series in North America.

I've done a few of these articles on English dubs for anime, and I've discussed at great length specific anime dubs I've liked or disliked. However, I haven't really explained what it is I look for in an anime dub, what I think of English dubs for anime in general, or anything of that sort. Because of this, people may misunderstand some of my views on them. So I'd like to dedicate this particular entry to laying out what it is I expect from the anime dubs I listen to, when I listen to them.

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